Massive viking ship buried on an island for a 1000 years

From the Washington Post:

There was no greater honor for a Viking than to die in battle, beginning a journey from the flat Earth up toward Valhalla, where an eternal feast awaited. “They can have a fight and party every day,” Knut Paasche, a period archaeologist said, “and then the next day, do it again.”

But they needed a vessel to get there. Chieftains and kings, laid to rest in long ships with swords and jewels, were buried in earthen mounds signifying their stature, Paasche said. The larger the ship and mound, the more important the burial.

Archaeologists using ground-penetrating radar found a big mound carved into a western Norwegian island — along with the remains of a “huge” ship as long as 55 feet, Paasche told The Washington Post, in a discovery that may tell new tales about how the ships evolved to become fearsome and agile vessels more than 1,000 years ago

Read full article…

Editing old writing

After a long hiatus of not writing any new stories, I decided to go back and read Ravens Beneath the Ash today. I first wrote this short story over ten years ago. Life has kept me busy with other things the past few years but I thought I’d re-read some of my old writings to see how they feel today. Personally, I was surprised how it held up after all this time. There wasn’t much I wanted to change initially after a first read-through. I just broke up the paragraphs a bit more to make it read a little quicker. It’s always interesting to revisit old stories or poems and see how they feel after a long break. Most of the time I end up hating my older writings, but this story I still personally enjoy. Happy Thursday!

Did the Anglo-Saxons discover Planet Nine?

From The Sun:

While NASA grapples with the mysteries of Planet Nine using modern telescopes and high-tech probes, two researchers are taking a trip back in time to find the missing world.

The duo from Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland are looking to Anglo-Saxons for clues of the super-earth’s existence and they’re sharing their findings with the public.

Medievalist Marilina Cesario and astronomer Pedro Lacerda are scouring a wealth of ancient tapestries and scrolls from the Dark Ages looking for evidence of a ninth planet in our solar system and whether it was mentioned in any type of historical record.

Read more…

For Honor

A slight departure from my normal historical based posts, but I wanted to highlight For Honor, the video game title by Ubisoft coming out Feb 14. Video gaming is kind of a side passion of mine, and I always take note when a game set in the medieval period comes out. While not historically accurate by any means, the game is based in medieval combat with various characters to play as (Vikings, Knights, Samurai) as you battle across various landscapes and countries in both a single player, campaign style narrative, as well as multiplayer, PVP combat.

The open beta launches this week from Feb 9 – Feb 12.

More info regarding the game and beta can be found on Ubisoft’s official For Honor site.

Immigration in Medieval England

I don’t so much care to discuss current immigration politics, but since that is all the news is covering lately, I thought it would be interesting to look up what immigration was like in England during the Middle Ages. The following article from medievalists.net references England particularly during the 14th – 16th centuries. This period was after the Black Death when the population across Europe was significantly lower and there was a lot more work available.

According to research provided by the Universities of York and Sheffield, approximately 1% of the population of England during this time was made up of immigrants. Today that number is approximately 12% according to this study.

About one out of every hundred people in late medieval England was an immigrant, according to researchers at the universities of York and Sheffield. They have also launched a new database that offers details about 65,000 immigrants who lived in England between 1330 and 1550.

The England’s Immigrants project was created by these universities with support from the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). It is led by Mark Ormrod, of the University of York’s Centre for Medieval Studies.

The database offers information on the names, origins, occupations and households of a significant number of foreigners who chose to live and work in England during the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries…

Read the full article at medievalists.net, which also provides links to the research database and other articles of interest.