50 graves discovered at medieval pilgrimage site in England

From Fox News:

The skeletal remains of about 50 medieval individuals have been discovered in shallow graves near the pilgrimage site of a famous seventh-century saint in England.

The human remains, which have been exhumed, may help archaeologists learn more about the medieval era, according to Archaeology Warwickshire, an archaeology and excavation firm. The company plans to study each skeleton to determine its sex and approximate age, and to identify evidence of injuries or diseases preserved in the bones, said Stuart Palmer, the business manager of Archaeology Warwickshire

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Storm uproots tree, reveals skeleton of medieval man

From weather.com:

When a winter storm hit Ireland earlier this year, it brought more than just strong wind and snow. The storm uprooted a 215-year-old beech tree that had been covering up a stunning secret: the skeletal remains of a medieval young man, according to the Sligo-Leitrim Archaeological Services and Live Science.

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Warrior tomb discovered in Poland

From Archaeology.org:

SANDOMIERZ, POLAND—An early eleventh-century wooden chamber tomb containing the remains of an elite warrior has been unearthed in southwestern Poland. Science in Poland reports that archaeologists discovered a number of artifacts in the grave, including ceramic vessels, a silver ring, and an iron knife, among other objects.

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Medieval objects uncovered at shopping center in Oxford

From the BBC:

Rare and exciting” leather and wooden objects 700 years old have been found at an archaeological dig in Oxford.

Experts uncovered 50 medieval leather shoes and a bag as well as a wooden bowl and timber posts at the Westgate Shopping Centre excavation.

The objects which “tell us about everyday people” have been so well preserved because the Thames floodplain area is below the water level.

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Ghostly faces and invisible verse found in medieval King Arthur text

From Fox News:

Ghostly faces and lines of verse previously invisible to the naked eye have been uncovered in the oldest surviving medieval manuscript written entirely in Welsh.

“The Black Book of Carmarthen,” dating to 1250, contains texts from the ninth through 12th centuries, including some of the earliest references to Arthur and Merlin.

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Medieval palace uncovered in England

From Fox News:

A prehistoric fortress is home to a much later structure: what may be one of the biggest medieval palaces ever discovered, one whose remnants remain buried beneath the ground.

The site in southern England is surrounded by huge earthworks that date to the Iron Age. Researchers used ground-penetrating radar and other technology to investigate what’s under the grass within the inner and outer baileys of the former fort.

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Reconstructing the faces of medieval Scots

From edinburgh.gov.uk:

A five-year project to analyse bodies discovered during an archaeological dig by the City of Edinburgh Council and Headland Archaeology has shed new light on Leithers of the past.

Forensic artists have now unveiled what the Medieval residents of the former burgh might have looked like some 500 years ago.

A team of experts from the University of Dundee (external link) carried out a painstaking process to reconstruct the faces of the 14th to 17th century remains, discovered near Constitution Street.

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Rome’s Colosseum a dwelling in medieval times

From Discovery.com.

Forget gory shows and gladiatorial combat. In the late Middle Ages, Rome’s Colosseum was a huge condominium, says the latest archaeological investigation into Rome’s most iconic monument.

Archaeologists from Roma Tre University and students from the American University of Rome unearthed evidence showing that ordinary Romans lived within the Colosseum from the ninth century until at least 1349, when the building was seriously damaged by an earthquake.

During a three-week excavation beneath some of the arched entrances that lead into the arena, the archaeologists discovered terracotta sewage pipes, potsherds and the foundations of a 12th-century wall that once enclosed one of the properties.

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Richard III laid to rest

From Yahoo News:

King Richard III of England will be laid back to rest in a wooden coffin sealed inside a tomb made of Swaledale fossil stone in Leicester Cathedral, the dean of the cathedral announced Monday (June 16)…

…The Plantagenet Alliance and its supporters argued that Richard III had adopted York as his hometown in life (he spent about a third of his 33 years in the city). Leicester, the scene of his ignominious burial in 1485, would not be the king’s choice of resting place, the group argued.

However, a British High Court ruled on May 23 that the University of Leicester had a valid exhumation license, and thus could reinter Richard’s remains.

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Bones of Swedish medieval king examined

From the AP:

UPPSALA, Sweden (AP) — Researchers from Uppsala University on Wednesday opened a small gilded box containing the skull and bones of Swedish King Erik IX, who became a national saint after he was murdered in 1160.

The researchers also removed the king’s burial crown, which is the oldest known royal crown in Sweden, to display it to the public for the first time.

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More links: 

Scientists pry open 850-year-old coffin holding murdered king – Fox News

Scholars Analyze Bones of Swedish Medieval King – ABC News