Digitizing the medieval world

From Philly.com:

At Lehigh University, a visitor to the Linderman Library can plunge into the Middle Ages and study a 15th-century text that shows the Earth as the center of the universe.

Or touch the pages of an oversize religious songbook, adorned with gold leaf and painted in bright hues on calfskin, and held by monks hundreds of years ago as they lifted their voices in unison …

… Soon, viewers won’t have to travel to Bethlehem, Pa., to view Lehigh’s varied medieval collection. Anyone anywhere in the world will be able to see the items with a click of a mouse.

Read the full article.

Yoda found in medieval manuscript

From AV Club:

There has been a lot of exciting Star Wars news over the last few days, but this might be the most exciting thing yet: irrefutable proof that Yoda existed in medieval France. Julian Harrison, a curator for the British Library, made the shocking discovery—as reported by The Telegraphwhen he was examining a manuscript that dates back to the 14th century for his Medieval Manuscripts blog. Ostensibly depicting the biblical story of Samson, the document in question shows a robed man with greenish skin, big ears, long hair, and claw-like hands. It is, without a doubt, Yoda.

Read more…

Ghostly faces and invisible verse found in medieval King Arthur text

From Fox News:

Ghostly faces and lines of verse previously invisible to the naked eye have been uncovered in the oldest surviving medieval manuscript written entirely in Welsh.

“The Black Book of Carmarthen,” dating to 1250, contains texts from the ninth through 12th centuries, including some of the earliest references to Arthur and Merlin.

Read more…

Codex Gigas

The Codex Gigas is one of the largest surviving medieval manuscripts in the world. Believed to have been created by Herman the Recluse in the Benedictine monastery of Podlazice in Bohemia, the collection contains the Vulgate Bible as well as additional historical documents written in Latin. The monastery was destroyed during the Hussite Revolution. For more on the Hussite Revolution, I would recommend Victor Verney’s book Warrior of God.

The Codex Gigas is also commonly known as the Devil’s Bible due to the large illustration of the devil found inside. The manuscript now resides in the National Library of Sweden in Stockholm.

Stuff You Missed in History Class has a good podcast covering this topic as well as links to additional reading about the codex.

*image copyright, author attribution: Kungl. biblioteket