Rome Colosseum in medieval times

Rome’s Colosseum a dwelling in medieval times

From Discovery.com. Forget gory shows and gladiatorial combat. In the late Middle Ages, Rome’s Colosseum was a huge condominium, says the latest archaeological investigation into Rome’s most iconic monument. Archaeologists from Roma Tre University and students from the American University of Rome unearthed evidence showing that ordinary Romans lived within the Colosseum from the ninth…

richardIII

Richard III laid to rest

From Yahoo News: King Richard III of England will be laid back to rest in a wooden coffin sealed inside a tomb made of Swaledale fossil stone in Leicester Cathedral, the dean of the cathedral announced Monday (June 16)… …The Plantagenet Alliance and its supporters argued that Richard III had adopted York as his hometown…

archaeology-excavation

Bones of Swedish medieval king examined

From the AP: UPPSALA, Sweden (AP) — Researchers from Uppsala University on Wednesday opened a small gilded box containing the skull and bones of Swedish King Erik IX, who became a national saint after he was murdered in 1160. The researchers also removed the king’s burial crown, which is the oldest known royal crown in…

Bone found at English abbey could be King Alfred the Great

From Fox News: British archeologists are hoping they have discovered partial remains of the ninth-century’s King Alfred the Great at a medieval abbey in southwest England. Preliminary tests suggest that a pelvic bone found in a museum box is either Alfred, or his son, Kind Edward the Elder. The bone was among remains excavated some 15…

Ancient road leading to Stonehenge

From Fox News: Scientists have uncovered a portion of an ancient path that may have led to Stonehenge. While dismantling a modern road that runs near Stonehenge, the archaeologists uncovered two ditches found to be remnants of an ancient pathway called the avenue. Archaeologists have known of the avenue and suspected it led directly to…

Badger unearths medieval grave

From Fox News: Some archaeologists pore over old maps and manuscripts to make historical discoveries. Others rely on pick axes, trowels and other tools. But archaeologists in Germany simply turned to badgers, the digging mammals that are the bane of gardeners everywhere. A badger living in the countryside near the town of Stolpe recently uncovered a…