Skip to content

Medieval Term of the Day: Investiture

Investiture Pronunciation: [in-ves-ti-cher, -choor] Function: noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin investitura, from investitus, past participle of investire The act of formally putting someone into an office or landholding; it was a major occasion of dispute in the eleventh and twelfth centuries when reformers opposed lay rulers who invested clergy… Read More »Medieval Term of the Day: Investiture

Medieval Term of the Day: Heriot

Heriot Pronunciation:  \hare-E-et\ Function: noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English heregeatwe, plural, military equipment, from here army (akin to Old High German heri army) + geatwe equipment a) A payment which a feudal lord may claim from the possessions of a dead serf or other tenant, essentially a death… Read More »Medieval Term of the Day: Heriot

Who versus Whom

This is one of those tough grammar questions in writing that even I have a tough time remembering. When do I use who and when do I use whom? The following is an easy way to remember this distinction. Use who when you could replace it with he or she. Example… Read More »Who versus Whom

Medieval Term of the Day: Scutage

Scutage Pronunciation: \?skü-tij, ?skyü-\ Function: noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin scutagium, from Latin scutum shield Date: 15th century The sum that the holder of a knight’s fee may pay his lord in lieu of military service. Sometimes used as a form of tax.